Cover to Cover: The Fault In Our Stars, Ch. 1 . . . again

So if you were reading along with me last time, you might’ve thought the chapter ended on a weird, kinda anticlimactic note. I did, too . . . that is, until I realized that this site doesn’t actually break the pages up into chapters (this one is better about it, though). So that wasn’t the end.

Probably should’ve checked that when I made the post . . . 3 weeks ago.

I’m really good at this.
I’m good at blogging, I swear.

Anyway, so originally I’d thought I would cram the rest of chapter 1 into a post with the second chapter. But . . . wow, the end of this one was a doozy. If all these chapters give me so much material, I might start breaking these into multiple parts.

So remember when I said that Sunshine didn’t bother thinking about all those dead kids and it was another sign she’s an insensitive brat?

I know, it was 3 weeks ago. I’d practically forgotten too.
I know, it was 3 weeks ago. I’d practically forgotten too.

Anyway, turns out that was uncharitable of me, because she does have thoughts about them:

It was a long list. The world contains a lot of dead people. And while Patrick droned on, reading the list from a sheet of paper because it was too long to memorize, I kept my eyes closed, trying to think prayerfully but mostly imagining the day when my name would find its way onto that list, all the way at the end when everyone had stopped listening.

Lovely. But really, this isn’t that bad. If I was going to die soon, I’d probably feel . . . wait. Is this chick actually dying? We haven’t actually had any discussion of what she has or what it means or anything.

Is it bad that I don’t really care?

giphy

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Cover to Cover: The Fault In Our Stars, Ch. 1

John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars is a beautiful heartwarming incredibly popular young adult novel about the relationship between two teenage cancer survivors. It has a 4.4 rating on Goodreads, a 4.7 on Amazon, and the movie has an 80% rating on Rotten Tomatoes — an impressive score on a site famous for hating everything.

Pictured: The popularity of Twilight mixed with the rabid nerd-snobbery of Firefly.
Pictured: The popularity of Twilight mixed with the rabid nerd-snobbery of Firefly.

So . . . this is a big deal. In its subject matter, in its incredible popularity, and especially in the fact that many of its fans are crazy.

I wasn’t kidding.
I wasn’t kidding.

To review this book requires a lot of thoughtfulness, delicacy, and tact. Clearly I’m not the right person for the job, but here we are: cover to cover, we’re reading The Fault in Our Stars, an internet sensation written by an internet sensation.

Nervous? Who’s nervous?
Nervous? Who’s nervous?

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